Jun
26

Coathooks for Wizard Cloaks

Filed Under (ICT, Personal thoughts, Reflection) by on 26-06-2012

Some great debates at RethinkingICT today. Certainly some thought provoking presentations. My head certainly hurt by the end of it, and in many ways I wasn’t that much clearer about where we should be going or even want to be going with ICT (if that’s what it remains to be called!). So many ideas, so many differing views, all at least seemingly held together by the desire of best practice glue with atoms of children’s best interests interwoven. But where does one go from here?

It’s all very well to say go forth, share and shout. But about what? A good lesson? A good series of lessons? An exciting product, software, web 2.0 tool I’ve found? Who decides what ‘good’ is? Where is the criteria by which that should be judged? I’m not really a shouter. I’m not a hoarder or particularly precious about what I do either. I love collaborative practice. But I also want some direction. I want to know that my practice is based on a sound core set of values/skills/competences. I want to be able to put my learners on a progressive pathway which includes some signposts for both of us to measure ourselves against.

I didn’t sense that really came out today.

The best piece of clarity I had was amongst the bagels in Waitrose afterwards, where I met a fellow lurking delegate. An English teacher (not ICT) whose background includes a far stronger base of experience than mine. She reflected how during the day she had observed the hammering out of similar ideas which the English profession have been doing for years.

As we berate the standard of ICT being taught by a potentially fabulous Maths teacher, they cry in frustration at how a brilliant Science teacher doesn’t bother to point out or correct incorrect punctuation. As we grapple with what the different parts of ICT should be called, contain and how they should be best taught – similar conversations have been had by the English specialists.

English (or Literacy) is divided into parts – all integral to a successful whole – grammar, handwriting, various genres of writing, speaking and listening, and critical analysis skills. We teach these elements but put our own stamp on it, use stimuli that enthuse and engage the learners in our own classes, use the core skills in a progressive manner to underpin the more exciting layers we put on top. Surely the same applies to any renewed ICT programme? I don’t want a prescriptive off-the-shelf solution (I know no-one was suggesting that) but I do want some sort of pedagogically sound framework on which to hang my personalised teaching and learning.

As a new ICT Coordinator, with a near-nonexistent curriculum and teachers still holding on to teaching powerpoint for grim death – what can I take away from today and use immediately? @ShelliBB reminded me of the importance of giving the children ownership for their digital future and I will relook at my Digital Leader program with renewed vigor, @mrlockyer engagingly reminded us that we all live in a REAL world – analogue is a present that should be enjoyed now and not solely through a digital lense. And @TheHeadsOffice showed me that at the heart of great change is often a simple idea that works – and I will even in the dying days of this academic year try and get some pupils engaged with the 100 word Challenge.

As for some sort of framework, the closest I saw today to something that fits the purpose for our school is the Digital Studies model (http://digitalstudieswiki.pbworks.com/w/page/49888869/Welcome) courtesy of @sharland, @infernaldepart and @teachesict, but it’s something I need to look into in more detail. I will also look through NAACE, Ian Addison’s (http://www.ictplanning.co.uk/) and Matt Lovegrove’s (http://www.mrlovegrove.net/category/resources/) planning ideas – and no doubt spend the summer armed with a wall and post-it notes.

I do know that any framework at the core of the curriculum I will use needs to be adaptable to the environment into which it is placed, whether that be a highly motivated digitally supportive school, or a more traditional and electronically challenged one. It needs to be simple and deliverable in bite-sized chunks so as not to overwhelm the tech-reluctant teacher. Strong enough to be bulked out and fluid enough to adapt with changing technology.

I’m not lazy by any stretch of the imagination, but I don’t feel qualified to create from scratch, or even confident enough propose something so key to far more experienced practitioners. However I am more than happy to play my part, but I would prefer that to be adding to the muscle that holds the skeleton up rather than rebuilding the actual skeleton. Think if it more like the rehabilitating physiotherapist tailoring the exercises to the individual rather than the surgeon rebuilding a shattered body.

Too much to ask then – for some other intelligent bods, more experienced me, to design some pedagogically sound coat hooks on which I can help learners hang wizard cloaks (magic ones – but not made solely of the dust that comes out of the back of ipads!)???

 

Big thanks to Louisa Farrow, Head of English and Director of Studies at Winchester House for the interesting chat.
Oh and to Chris Leach for organising a brilliant event.

 



One Response to “Coathooks for Wizard Cloaks”

  1.   Julia Skinner (@theheadsoffice) Says:

    Many thanks for getting me going again on my thoughts of the day. It was ‘action packed’ but like you I don’t feel we have come away with an action plan! So good to meet you!

    Reply

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